Correlates and preferences of resistance training among older adults in Alberta, Canada

Erin A. Bampton, Steven T. Johnson, Jeff K. Vallance

Abstract


OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of resistance training among older adults in Alberta, Canada, has never been measured. Hence, there is no clear understanding of the demographic and health-related factors associated with resistance training, or older adults’ resistance training programming preferences. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of resistance training behaviours among older adults in Alberta.

METHODS: Older adults (>55 years) from across Alberta were invited to participate in this study. Participants completed self-reported measures of resistance training behaviours, demographics, health-related information, and resistance training program interest and preferences.

RESULTS: A total of 358 (of 393) participants returned a completed survey, for a response rate of 91.1%. Overall, 53.1% met Canadian resistance training guidelines. On average, participants engaged in resistance training on 1.8 (SD = 1.9) days per week for an average of 1.6 hours (SD = 1.3). Preferences included resistance training in a fitness club (45.7%) and morning training times (51.7%). Indicating an ability to participate in a resistance training program for older adults was associated with being age 65 years or older (OR = 2.4; 95% CI, 0.69 to 8.0, p = 0.017) and being male (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 0.73 to 6.69, p = 0.016). Those meeting resistance training guidelines were significantly less likely to have a chronic disease (OR = 0.60; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.95, p = 0.03).

CONCLUSION: Older adults had unique preferences for receiving resistance training counseling and programming. These preferences were associated with specific demographic and health-related variables.


Keywords


Resistance training; older adults; health behaviour; movement

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17269/cjph.107.5365