Creating a collective impact on childhood obesity: Lessons from the SCOPE initiative

Shazhan Amed, Patti-Jean Naylor, Susan Pinkney, Stephanie Shea, Louise C. Mâsse, Stephen Berg, Jean-Paul Collet, Joan Wharf Higgins

Abstract


OBJECTIVES: We describe the processes used in SCOPE, a community-based participatory research (CBPR) initiative, to achieve multisectoral engagement and collective action to prevent childhood obesity.

PARTICIPANTS: SCOPE engages representatives from various sectors (local government, health, schools, recreation, local media, early childhood, community services) who influence the environments in which children live, learn and play.

SETTING: SCOPE has been implemented in three communities in British Columbia (BC).

INTERVENTION: SCOPE (www.live5210.ca) is a multi-setting, multi-component initiative designed to enhance a community’s capacity to create and deliver localized solutions to promote healthy weights among children. SCOPE, in partnership with a local organization, engages multiple stakeholders who plan and implement actions framed by a common evidence-based health message (‘Live 5-2-1-0’). SCOPE’s central team in Vancouver, BC facilitates alignment with provincial initiatives, knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) within and across communities, and the collection, analysis and reporting of shared data.

OUTCOMES: Best practice processes that have emerged from SCOPE’s experience align with the principles of CBPR and the five conditions of Collective Impact – a common agenda, mutually reinforcing action, continuous communication, a backbone organization and shared measurement. SCOPE has achieved sustainable practice change framed by a common agenda (‘Live 5-2-1-0’) leading to mutually reinforcing cross-sectoral action.

CONCLUSION: A multi-pronged community-led childhood obesity prevention initiative can be achieved using CBPR principles and attending to the conditions for achieving collective impact.


Keywords


Pediatric obesity; prevention & control; health promotion; community-based participatory research

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17269/cjph.106.5114